Aid Works - Here's How

In September 2000, world leaders agreed a set of goals for the international community, to bring about a world in which sustaining development and eliminating poverty would have the highest priority.

Progress since then shows the power of such a set of shared goals:

ERADICATING EXTREME HUNGER AND POVERTY

  • Extreme poverty is falling in all regions of the world.
  • There are now 600 million fewer people living in dire poverty. The proportion of people living below the poverty line fell from 47% in 1990 to 24% in 2008.
  • About one in four children under the age of five is underweight in the developing world, down from almost one in three in 1990.


ACHIEVE UNIVERSAL PRIMARY EDUCATION

  • Enrolment rates among children of primary school age increased markedly in Sub-Sahara Africa: from 58% in 1999 to 76% in 2010.
  • This means that, for the first time ever, 9 out of every 10 (primary school age) children in the world are in school.
  • About 69 million school-age children are not in school. Almost half of them (31 million) are in sub-Saharan Africa, and more than a quarter (18 million) are in Southern Asia.


PROMOTE GENDER EQUALITY AND EMPOWER WOMEN

  • The world has achieved parity in primary education between girls and boys.
  • The ratio between the enrolment rates of girls and boys grew from 91% to 97% in 2010.
  • The global share of women in parliament continues to rise slowly and reached 19% in 2010 — far short of gender parity.


REDUCE CHILD MORTALITY

  • Millions of children now live to see their 5th birthday.
  • Despite population growth, the number of under-five child deaths fell from 12 million in 1990 to 7.6 million in 2010.
  • In developing countries, the mortality rate declined by 35 per cent, from 97 deaths per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 63 in 2010.


IMPROVE MATERNAL HEALTH

  • Maternal mortality has nearly halved since 1990.
  • Globally, maternal death ratios fell from 400 per 100,000 live births in 1990 to 210 per 100,000 in 2010.
  • In 2010, 66% of births were attended by skilled health personnel, up from 57% in 1990.


COMBAT HIV and AIDS, MALARIA AND OTHER DISEASES

  • Access to treatment for people living with HIV increased in all regions.
  • At the end of 2010, 6.5 million people in developing countries were receiving anti-retroviral therapy for HIV and AIDS - an increase of 1.4 million people since 2009.
  • Globally, tuberculosis rates have been falling since 2002, meaning the world is on track towards halving the number of patients by 2015.
  • The number of deaths resulting from malaria has decreased globally by 17% since 2000. Reported malaria cases fell by 50% since 2000.


ENSURE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

  • In 2010, 89% of all the people on Earth have access to safe drinking water (compared to 76% in 1990).
  • The target of halving the number of people living without access to safe drinking water was achieved in 2010.
  • The lives of over 200 million people living in urban slums (43 times the total population of Ireland!) have been improved, through provision of water and sanitation.


GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP FOR DEVELOPMENT

  • Between 2000 and 2009, ODA increased from $72 to $128 billion.
  • Per capita, aid to the poorest countries increased dramatically after 2000 after a decade of decreases.
  • Net development aid stayed stable in terms of the percentage of GNI of OECD member countries: 0.32% in 1990 and 2010, falling short of the promised 0.7% ODA/GNI target.
  • Poor countries’ debt burden reduced significantly, from 12.6% of export earnings in 2000 to 3% in 2010.
  • Almost two thirds of Internet users worldwide are now in developing regions.


What is clear is that the existence of a globally agreed set of goals has made a dramatic change to the lives of millions of people.

But it is also clear that, as these goals are set to be achieved by 2015, more effort is required to fully achieve the Goals. And new ideas are needed urgently, to build on what has worked and to set new priorities for the period beyond 2015.